Scottish Shortbread wi’ a wee bit o’ Auld Lang Syne

Shortbread flipped 2Having lived in Scotland, I’m a bit homesick around Hogmanay… tonight will be loud and cheerful throughout Scotland, rain or not.  So to ease my homesickness, here’s a wee touch o’ Bonnie Scotland.  Happy Hogmanay, everyone!

Scottish Shortbread

Traditionally, Scottish shortbread is either broken off in pieces from one large slab, or scored with a knife before baking into ~1/2 inch “fingers” to break off after baking; scoring into “pie” shaped pieces is also common.  I’ve made it as a large sheet scored, the traditional shape that says “shortbread” to me.  For the best results, use real, fresh butter; margarine does not count.  After all, if you’re going to make it, do it right!

2 C. butter, softened

1 C. light brown sugar

~ 3 ½–4 C.  plain white flour

½ tsp.  salt

Fast Method:

Cream butter until white with a mixer.  Add brown sugar & salt.  Beat very well.  Add flour.  Beat with a dough hook.  Drop cookies on cookie sheets with teaspoon. Pierce with a fork or toothpick at even intervals to keep them flat while baking. Bake @ 150°C for 15–20 minutes.  Do not brown, or they will become too dry.

Traditional Method:

Cream butter & brown sugar with a fork until well mixed.  Add salt & mix.  Add 3 ½ C. of flour, & mix with fork.  Use the remaining flour while rolling out into a sheet.  Turn out dough & knead for 5–10 minutes until well mixed with an even consistency.  Roll out to ¼” & cut cookies, either with cookie cutters, or by scoring with a knife.  Pierce with a fork or toothpick at even intervals to keep them flat while baking.  Bake @ 150°C for 20–25 minutes.  Do not brown.

Auld Lang Syne

Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
and never brought to mind ?
Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
and auld lang syne?
 

For auld lang syne, my jo,
for auld lang syne,
we’ll tak a cup o’ kindness yet,
for auld lang syne.

And surely ye’ll be your pint-stowp!
and surely I’ll be mine!
And we’ll tak a cup o’ kindness yet,
for auld lang syne.
 
We twa hae run about the braes,
and pu’d the gowans fine;
But we’ve wander’d mony a weary fit,
sin auld lang syne.
 
We twa hae paidl’d i’ the burn,
frae morning sun till dine;
But seas between us braid hae roar’d
sin auld lang syne.
 
And there’s a hand, my trusty fiere!
and gie’s a hand o’ thine!
And we’ll tak a right gude-willy waught,
for auld lang syne.

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